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Corporate Culture

Employees’ motivation levels are often guided by the prevalent company culture. Any company looking to up its employee motivation levels needs to work on the three Ps, namely Play, Purpose and Potential. The first one refers to a feeling of bonhomie within the ranks, so that work does not become a chore, while the second is about the overall mission the company is chasing. The third can always be upped using the right corporate training mechanisms. There are several stimuli which shape the entire fulfilment of the three Ps. One of them is the emotional pressure exerted from multiple ends. Another is economic pressure, which is often the biggest driver. A third is inertia, which refers to a significant gap between the corporate strategy, and how one identifies one’s place within the broader scheme of things. If one takes the sample of airlines, Southwest usually comes out right on top, with United at the bottom, while American and Delta slug it out for the middle spots. Trader Joe’s gets the top billing among grocers, with Albertsons at the bottom. Companies too must curate a detailed career ladder to help employees plan out the journey ahead. A weekly reflection huddle within each team is a good way to start. The reasons behind the success or failures of any project need also be examined in detail with the team.

Source:https://hbr.org/2015/11/how-company-culture-shapes-employee-motivation?utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=hbr&utm_source=twitter

Uploaded Date:26 August 2019

Organizational changes are a constant to any business. A lot of companies, approach this wrongly, by merely telling the employees. Instead, the employees need to be forewarned well in advance, of the impending changes, so they may adjust their own plans accordingly. The best way to do this, is to showcase the corporate strategy, with a compelling vision for the future. Another is to keep them duly informed, by regularly communicating with them. The leaders and managers need to be empowered to lead through with the change targeted. Creative ways too need to be found by which employees could be involved in this change. Thus, the four arches of inform, inspire, engage and empower need to be followed up for this.

Source:https://hbr.org/2018/10/dont-just-tell-employees-organizational-changes-are-coming-explain-why?utm_source=twitter&utm_campaign=hbr&utm_medium=social

Uploaded Date:20 August 2019

Digital transformation has typically been associated with incidents of customers, employees and partners being disrupted. There still remain smart tactics to survive this purge, and even thrive in it. The MIT Sloan Center for Information Systems Research has conducted a thorough data warehousing operation over the past four years, to come up with specific pointers to this end. There are four transformational paths towards this final goal. The first one, is about ensuring the operational efficiency. Then, the brand needs to focus on the customer experience. Both these two need to be addressed via iterative steps. Finally, a future- ready organization needs to be curated from scratch by breaking away to a fresh entity. The first stage is known as the Decision rights, followed by new ways of thinking. The third stage within the organizational explosions curve is to possess a platform mindset. And lastly, there needs to be an organizational surgery.

Source:https://mitsloan.mit.edu/ideas-made-to-matter/business-leaders-gird-organizational-explosions

Uploaded Date:14 August 2019

Decision making is oft a time consuming and messy affair. At the root of this problem, lies the categorization on decision to be made. To ease this process, an ABCD of decision making has been designed. A is for Ad hoc decisions. These arise suddenly and their impact on the broader organization depends upon the frequency. Such occurrences are infrequent and unfamiliar. B stands for the Big- bet decisions. These are the ones that alter the corporate strategy from the very top. There is a broad scope and impact in them while also being an unfamiliar happening. The third category is the C which goes with Cross- cutting decisions. Their scope is broad, are frequent in occurrence, while the stakeholders concerned are fairly familiar with such. Lastly with D are the Delegated decisions. While their impact remains narrow, their occurrence is also frequent.

Source:https://www.mckinsey.com/business-functions/organization/our-insights/untangling-your-organizations-decision-making?cid=other-eml-ttn-mkq-mck-oth-1712

Uploaded Date:29 July 2019

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