MANAGING in the

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Corporate Culture

A system started in the year 2017 at the INSEAD among MBA students, was the concept of Reciprocity Rings. This is a system where peers can help each other out when they are in the position to do so. One of the students who needed to travel regularly for some personal matters, away from the campus to the city of Lille, also in France, she met help from an unexpected source, through this method. The helper was the head of talent recruitment from the INSEAD campus. The success of this concept, needs to be replicated at organizations as well. One need not hesitate to ask for aid when genuinely in need of. So, companies need to curate a culture of reciprocity, where people are ready to seek help. University campuses have already started replicating this model. Key examples of this include the Carnegie Mellon University, the Stanford Graduate School of Business and the Columbia University.

Source:https://knowledge.insead.edu/blog/insead-blog/creating-a-culture-of-reciprocity-6576

Uploaded Date:20 May 2019

Organizational change is no longer merely about trying out all possibilities, before sticking to the final choice. Instead, it is now a proper science involving several steps. To start off, companies need to organize corporate training programmes which will showcase in evidence the changes being wrought out. They must then bring out the change strategies out of the mere averages. This will help to quell the sudden changes in the work requirements. Next up, companies need to be up front and embrace the complexities and uncertainties, that are bound to arise during this change management. To ensure change takes place smoothly, the right talent recruitment needs to take place. For this, technology has to be utilized. Emerging science streams need to be also tapped into.

Source:https://www.bcg.com/publications/2019/science-organizational-change.aspx

Uploaded Date:20 May 2019

When a petrochemical giant recently acquired an energy upstart, there were several integration challenges. One of them arose in their disparate talent management practices. The latter encouraged independent thinking to spawn creativity, while the former focuses on processes to ensure uniformity in practices. The acquired company slowly started losing its identity, but alongside also its unique productivity, which made it an attractive proposition in the first place. The acquirer thus now faced a critical juncture in evaluating its corporate culture. The realization dawned that for different levels of success, a different set of practices would be desirable. Neither does copying culture works. So, Google’s famous work culture may not be replicable elsewhere. One has to find one’s own cultural strengths. An inventory must be made of one’s business culture.

Source:https://www.strategy-business.com/article/You-cant-benchmark-culture?gko=4e9e7

Uploaded Date:15 May 2019

A number of companies want to change their corporate culture, so start off by altering their mission and vision statements. Unsurprisingly, this has not been seen as effective, as quite often the statements do not translate in to real action. Thus, some lessons have been identified on the smooth incorporation of changes to the corporate culture. First of all, the changes cannot be made from the outside. So, the leadership needs to have people who are the fixers, or the insiders. The corporate strategy document remains merely so, without hands- on interference. A lot of companies end up not living up to the values stated on the documents. So, merely having them on these documents is no sign of eventual execution. A lot of programmes are initiated on the sur- of- the- moment when the decisions are made. While these programmes may be effective for a start, they are often doomed to failure, thanks to the employees’ assumptions, that those won’t remain permanent.

Source:https://www.strategy-business.com/blog/Want-to-change-corporate-culture-Focus-on-actions?gko=2ab70

Uploaded Date:11 May 2019

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